About Me

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Recent retiree--35 year's experience teaching reading, English, adult basic education and volunteer leadership skills. Started this blog to exchange ideas and commentary with friends and others having an interest in joining the discussions. Greatest life accomplishments include: 1.organized my 3rd grade class to check out library books for me to get around librarian's weekly limit--Amazon.com, the Mullins Elementary 3rd Grade Class of 1956 is still waiting for "thank you" notes; 2. volunteered in the Peace Corps, island of St. Kitts, West Indies; 3.taught adults to read, earn their GEDs., and speak English as a second language; 4. bought a border collie puppy for $6, got evicted rather than give him up, and began a life-long love affair with all things "Dog"; 5. joined a physical fitness boot camp in my mid-50s--don't mess with someone who's been doing regulation pushups in wet grass at 5:30 a.m.; 6. walked across Northern England with best friend Sally--over 80 miles from the Irish to North Seas; and 7. travelled to many foreign countries for pleasure and work.

Thursday, November 10, 2011

Friday Fences - Science Hill Inn



Friday Fences is a great way to meet creative photographers from all over. The meme is hosted by my blog buddy Janis at Life According to Jan and Jer . Go there to check out other fence photos and stories.

This is the iron fence that runs in front of the Sceince Hill Inn and Wakefield Scearce Gallery in Shelbyville, Kentucky. Science Hill has an interesting history, especially for educators. In 1825 Julia Ann Hieronymus married a young Methodist minister and settled in Louisville. She was a teacher who was determined to provide girls with a broader education beyond homekeeping, entertainment, painting and music which was thought to be sufficient for girls from "good" families of the time. In particular she wanted to teach her students about science. So, she opened a girl's preparatory school, first class had 20 students. That school was in operation for around 100 years.

Now the very elegant southern building houses a fine restaurant, Science Hill Inn, and Wakefield Scearce Gallery, which specializes in British Antiques. During the holiday time between Thanksgiving and Christmas this especially a wonderful place to visit. You can have lunch in the inn featuring the best southern cuisine. Then spend the afternoon going through room after room (used to be the school dormitory) of British antiques, each room fully decorated around a certain theme.

A group of my friends will be going there for a pre-Thanksgiving lunch. Already know I'll be ordering the Shrimp and Grits. If you're still looking for a new Thanksgiving or Christmas dish, here is the Science Hill Inn recipe:

Cheesy Grits:

Heat oven to 325 degrees. Grease a 2-quart casserole and set aside.

In a large pan add 1 tsp. salt to 4 cups of water and bring to boil over high heat. Slowly stir in 1 cup instant grits and cook until the grits thicken and take on a pudding-like texture, about 8 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in 1/2 cup butter, 4 oz. mild grated cheddar cheese, 6 oz. sharp white cheddar cheese and 1/2 tsp. garlic powder.

In a medium bowl, lightly beat 3 eggs and 3/4 cup heavy whipping cream together just until the eggs are thoroughly mixed. Stir into grits mixture.

Pour into casserole and bake 45 minutes.

Shrimp Gravy:

In a large sauce pan melt 4 tbsp. butter over medium heat. Add 1 medium chopped onion and cook until edges are slightly brown. Add 1 lb. peeled and deveined medium shrimp, 1 tsp. Herbs de Provence seasoning, 1 tsp. Cajun seasoning and 4 tbsp. butter. Increase heat to high. Cook, stirring constantly, to create a gravy-like sauce, until shrimp is an even shade of white. This will take about 5-10 minutes.

Pour shrimp gravy over grits. Garnish with 4 strips crisp bacon, crumbled, and 1/4 cup fresh minced parsley. Serve with lemon wedges. Don't skip the lemon as it is needed to make the shrimp pop and brighten the richness of the whole dish.

Serves 4.

27 comments:

Genie said...

I was shooting an iron fence sillier to this this afternoon, but the lighting was terrible so culled all of the photos. Will try again another day. This one is beautiful. So vintage looking. genie

Sayre said...

Oooo... that sounds delicious!!!!

Debs Carr said...

Great photo and I like the look of that recipe too.

Ramona said...

Love that fence, you've so much history over there.
That dish looks and sounds divine, but please can you tell me what 'grits' are/is??

Faye said...

ramona-"grits" is dried ground corn served commonly in the southern U.S. as a cereal-like accompaniment to breakfast foods such as eggs and bacon,

Jan n Jer said...

First of all...I love the fancy Iron fence. This place sounds so interesting. Faye...I am just wondering how your going to walk out of there after eating this to die for dish! I love love grits! you wont find them here in the N.East! Enjoy your luncheon! Thanks for sharing the recipe too!

Prasetyo said...

Nice blog. I'm very interesting to stop here. But, dont forget to visit and give some your opinion into my blog ya. Thanks for share.

Lindy MacDuff said...

Lovely fence, and nice to learn the background of the Science Hill Inn. I've never had shrimp with my grits but it looks like wonderful "comfort food!"

Thanks for your visit!

TexWisGirl said...

it's a beautiful gate. i love folks who think 'outside the box' when it comes to the norm of education. :)

Tricia @ Bluff Area Daily said...

mighty nice fence =)

Rose said...

Looks like his and hers gates, or else in and out. I would love to see more of this place...also love to see it in snow.

My fence is at Time Stand Still.

Judy said...

I love wrought iron fences like that! I have never had grits, so I am curious. Maybe someday...

Judy said...

Annie is a Schnauser/Tibetan terrier mix, according to the place we got her. Both dogs weigh just a bit over 25 pounds, but are shaped so differently. If you are going to get a really big dog, remember they have such short life spans. My sister had a wolfhound, and he only lived 5 or 6 years. I think that would hurt too much...

Buttons said...

I love your fence but I found the history fascinating and I really would love some of that soup right now. B

Pam said...

Its unanimous we all love iron fences, Faye.. and this one is exceptional.
I'm hungry gotta run..

2sweetnsaxy said...

I was all into the fences until I saw the shrimp and grits. Yummm!

Kim, USA said...

This fence is beautiful! And love that shrimp gravy especially in this cold day. ^_^ Thanks for the visit!

Fridays Fences

Wayne said...

Shrimp & grits sounds really good!! That is a great fence with lots of intricate details.

I was trying to get down as low as possible for that fence shot, to give the illusion that the fence was dominating the shot.

Healthier And Wealthier said...

Oh wow...that does look good! Found you on Button's blog today. I am a retired teacher too, admiring your accomplishment list! My area was Math and Staff Development...but I was "complete" after 29 years. It is now a whole new world! Yae!

Lesley said...

Not so sure about the grits, but the idea of going through room after room of British antiques sounds wonderful.
Nice fence, too.

NatureFootstep said...

I like iron fences. Mostly because they are so nicely done. :)

Ebie said...

Faye, this fence is very artistic, with its curves and design.

I want to try your dish. Where I come from (the Philippines)is a rice country, we grow a lot of corn, and the grits is our staple. But what I love about the grits here is they cook in an instant!

Regarding your comment, yes I have steady hands, which I have mastered (modestly speaking)I only get hand shake when shooting in low light. Carrying tripods is so annoying to me.

Nancy @ A Rural Journal said...

Beautiful grounds -- what fun to be able to wander and capture this historic structure.

The recipe sounds delicious. Thank you! :)

don said...

The iron work is beautiful and makes a fine subject. Nice shot.

Bridget Larsen said...

Wow very nice gate and what a lovely setting, thanks for the recipe, I must see how I can make it as we dont have grits here, I also love your watery Wednesday post
Bridget #22

Tracy said...

I love the iron fences. It gives character to a dwelling and really makes a statement in some cases. In this case, the fence adds such beauty and charm. Interesting facts about Science Hill Inn and anything with shrimp in it has to be yummy!

Inger-M said...

I love wrought iron fences, and this one is so beautiful! Great shots!